Windows Home Server System Builder Software Price Decrease Announced

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“On November 1, Microsoft will introduce a 30% price reduction of the Windows Home Server software for the System Builder channel.

 

After a successful year in the market, Microsoft is reducing the price of the System Builder version of Windows Home Server to provide additional value to the system builder community and further promote the home server category.

 

Momentum for Windows Home Server remains strong. During the first year, Windows Home Server has been embraced by System Builders in over 50 countries. The list of hardware partners continues to grow and third-party software developers have released or have announced more than 60 Add-in programs extending Windows Home Server’s capabilities.

Thanks for all of the great support over the last year, and we look forward to working with you all in continuing to grow the home server marketplace!

 

The Windows Home Server Team”

 

Great to hear this news from Microsoft, as I believe that not enough OEM’s have produced Windows Home Server units and maybe this will help drive more to do so!  

Windows Home Server for me, and other members of my family and friends, has changed the way they see and use home networks.   There is no doubt that anyone I have seen implement Windows Home Server would now not do without it.   PC backup imaging, Remote access, central storage are just some of the features that they love.

 

The problem, of course, is that the Windows Home Server team had a horrible bug, now fixed, in the early days of the product.   This, alongside terrible marketing and lack of hardware vendors then producing and marketing home servers meant that really only the “hardcore” installed the product and saw it’s use.   Such a shame, as it really is a wonderful product!

If you don’t have Windows Home Server, or never considered it for whatever reason, you should look again now.

  5 comments for “Windows Home Server System Builder Software Price Decrease Announced

  1. MillKa
    November 2, 2008 at 11:55 am

    I really wonder why the Windows Home Server team is trying so hard to hide their product.

    I am a SW developer and MSDN subscriber. The MSDN subscription gives me access to all MS operating systems, from dusty ole DOS/Win3.x to the newest shiny Server 2008 Enterprise Edition with Hyper-V and kitchen sink built in, so that i can test my stuff on the various OS. But WHS is still not available from MSDN. Many MSDN subribers have protested, but nothing happens.

    I wonder what the real message behind that is ? Does MS think WHS is not an operating system ? Does MS think, ISVs should not test their stuff on WHS ?

    And what is the message to WHS users ? WHS, the least tested OS available ?

    If WHS had been available on MSDN to ISVs, maybe the horrible bug would have been found before RTM ..

    Nick, i know this wasnt your idea, but maybe you know where to pass this message .. ;-P

  2. NickWhittome
    November 3, 2008 at 4:12 am

    Hi MilKa,

    I believe that if you are an Action Pack subscriber, you now have access to Windows Home Server…

    I need to clarify this.

    Nick

  3. bradley
    November 3, 2008 at 9:06 am

    Action pack now gets Home Server.

  4. MillKa
    November 3, 2008 at 3:38 pm

    Hi Nick,

    Thanks for the info about Action Pack, i didn’t knew about it before.

  5. Paul Bishop
    February 8, 2009 at 5:22 am

    I would 2nd the “try it now” statements 🙂 I took the plunge with my Action Pack copy a couple of weeks ago and I have been extreamly impressed.

    It’s lovely to have such a powerful and flexable storage and backup solution in home – that doesn’t demand hours of work to setup or maintain.

    I wish that there was a small office version available – the desktop PC backups and unique way of storing and protecting data make this far better than any NAS and a good companion to an SBS server.

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